WILLIAM HARTUNG

Director, Arms & Security Program

whartung@internationalpolicy.org

William D. Hartung is the director of the Arms and Security Program at CIP and the co-director of the Center's Sustainable Defense Task Force. He is the author of Prophets of War: Lockheed Martin and the Making of the Military-Industrial Complex (Nation Books, 2011) and the co-editor, with Miriam Pemberton, of Lessons from Iraq: Avoiding the Next War (Paradigm Press, 2008). His previous books include And Weapons for All (HarperCollins, 1995), a critique of U.S. arms sales policies from the Nixon through Clinton administrations.

 

From July 2007 through March 2011, Mr. Hartung was the director of the Arms and Security Initiative at the New America Foundation. Prior to that, he served as the director of the Arms Trade Resource Center at the World Policy Institute. He also worked as a speechwriter and policy analyst for New York State Attorney General Robert Abrams. Bill Hartung’s articles on security issues have appeared in the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Los Angeles Times, The Nation, and the World Policy Journal.

 

He has been a featured expert on national security issues on CBS 60 Minutes, NBC Nightly News, the PBS Newshour, CNN, Fox News, and scores of local, regional, and international radio outlets. He blogs for the Huffington Post, the Hill, and Medium.

Recent Publications

Fact sheet: Corrupt Bargain? One Company’s Monopoly on the Development of Long-Range Nuclear Missiles

by William Hartung

Sept-9-2020

The Pentagon has just announced a $13.3 billion contract to Northrop Grumman for the development of a new Intercontinental Ballistic Missile (ICBM), known formally as the Ground-Based Strategic Deterrent (GBSD). The Department is poised to spend $85 to $150 billion over the next decade and beyond on this new generation of ICBMs. New ICBMs are both unnecessary and dangerous. In a crisis, the president has only a matter of minutes to decide whether to launch them, significantly increasing the risk of an accidental nuclear war. The best outcome would be to stop the development of the new ICBM and eliminate current long-range nuclear missiles from the U.S. arsenal.

Latest News

Institutionalized Racism in U.S. Foreign Policy

William Hartung quoted

Sept-23-2020

Arms & Security Program

William Hartung, the director of the arms and security project at the Center for International Policy, explains that this spike in African terrorism incidents shows that the U.S. militarization response toward Africa was wholly unsuccessful in quelling violence in Africa as it was intended to do. He adds that fighting violence with violence may be aggravating the issue, instead of helping.

A $13 Billion Contract for ICBMs: What’s the Rush?

by William Hartung

Sept-23-2020

Arms & Security Program

The recent announcement by the U.S. Air Force that it will award Northrop Grumman $13.3 billion to develop a new intercontinental ballistic missile raises more questions than it answers. First and foremost: what’s the rush? The move greatly complicates the ability of the next administration – whoever wins the election in November – to rethink the Pentagon’s $2 trillion nuclear modernization plan in light of other demands both within and outside of the department’s budget.

Palestinians Cornered, But What Arabs Getting?

William Hartung quoted

Sept-20-2020

Arms & Security Program

William Hartung, director of the Arms and Security Program at the DC-based Center for International Policy, told Al Jazeera arms sales were an "important factor" in the agreements.

The UAE has long wanted F-35 fighter jets, Hartung said, and larger drones, which the US was unable to sell because of its commitment to Israel's military advantage.

2020 Election Could Decide Whether US Pursues Nuclear Escalation or Arms Control

William Hartung quoted

Sept-19-2020

Arms & Security Program

William Hartung, director of the Arms and Security Program at the Center for International Policy, says that while Trump and Biden’s approach to arms control is like “night and day,” the differences in actual defense spending are less clear. Biden himself has indicated he isn’t planning major military spending cuts.

World’s Most Powerful Islamic Country: Is The UAE Headed To Replace Turkey?

William Hartung quoted

Sept-17-2020

Arms & Security Program

According to William Hartung, Director of the Arms and Security Program at the Centre for International Policy (CIP) in Washington DC, the sale of arms has been an “important factor” in the historical accord.

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