SECURITY ASSISTANCE MONITOR

Security Assistance Monitor tracks and analyze U.S. security and defense assistance programs worldwide. By informing policymakers, media, scholars, NGOs and the public (in the United States and abroad) about trends and issues related to U.S. foreign security assistance, we seek to enhance transparency and promote greater oversight of U.S. military and police aid, arms sales and training.

RECENT PUBLICATIONS

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ISSUE BRIEF

U.S. Arms Sales to Japan

Sahir Amlani

As Japan transitions its armed forces from a defensive posture into one with more forward leaning capabilities, it has looked to acquire newer and more advanced weaponry. With an eye towards a more assertive China, Japan has bought billions more worth of arms from the U.S. over the past 5 years, steadily expanding its U.S. arms imports, presenting risks to escalating regional tensions.

U.S. Arms Sales to Japan
ISSUE BRIEF

U.S. Security Cooperation with Taiwan

Sydney Boer

The Trump administration’s expansion of arms sales and defense cooperation with Taiwan has riled China, escalating cross-strait tensions. Though efforts to enhance Taipei's defenses are aimed at deterring a hypothetical attempt from Beijing to retake the self-governing island, concerns remain that the arms transfers make little difference in Taiwan’s security situation while drawing China’s ire and worsening tensions in the Pacific.

U.S. Security Cooperation with Taiwan
ISSUE BRIEF

U.S. Security Assistance to Kenya Amidst Controversy over Drones

Sophia Ramcharitar

The U.S. is considering expanding AFRICOM's authorities to conduct drone strikes in majority-Muslim counties in eastern Kenya that border Somalia targeting al-Shabaab despite questions regarding the efficacy of such a strategy, its impact on civilians in the region and its legality under Kenyan law.

U.S. Security Assistance to Kenya Amidst Controversy over Drones

LATEST NEWS

Why the US’s counterterrorism strategy in the Sahel keeps failing

Security Assistance Monitor mentioned

"[H]ighly-classified signals intelligence from the National Security Agency and reports from the department of defence (DOD) and CIA... told a troubling story: one of corruption and discontent in the Malian military, a long-term beneficiary of US training and weapons that had recently sustained brutal losses to armed groups in the northern deserts.

A declassified defence department document from May 2019, obtained by arms trade watchdog Security Assistance Monitor, shows the US approved tens of millions of dollars in training, equipment and weapons for security forces across sub-saharan West Africa"

Not So Fast, Say Lawmakers Who Suspect Lame Duck Trump is Expediting UAE Weapons Deal

Elias Yousif and William Hartung quoted

“The UAE continues to maintain a contingent of forces in Yemen, and to arm and train militias that have engaged in systematic human rights abuses,” writes William Hartung and Elias Yousif in a recent Security Assistance Monitor brief. They also point to the UAE’s use of drones in Libya, which is in violation of a United Nations embargo.

US ending aid to Saudi-led forces in Yemen, but questions persist

William Hartung's and Elias Yousif's report quoted

“The Trump administration has concluded two major deals for precision-guided bombs to Saudi Arabia of the type being used in its brutal war in Yemen, as well as upgrades of its US-supplied F-15 aircraft that are a bulwark of the Saudi air war in Yemen,” the report said.

UAE Enrolls Its Lobbyists in F-35 Fight

"Center for International Policy" mentioned

The United Arab Emirates has enrolled its fleet of lobbyists to try to assuage bipartisan concerns from Capitol Hill and the incoming Joe Biden administration over its pending acquisition of the F-35 fighter jet.

Others have pointed to the UAE’s military actions in Libya and Yemen, which have come under international criticism, as reasons to be wary about selling the Gulf country more weapons.

“The UAE’s active role in a number of regional conflicts raises the prospect that the arms and munitions announced as part of the package could directly contribute to ongoing violence and a troubling history of international humanitarian law violations,” the dovish Center for International Policy said in a Nov. 13 issue brief.

EXPERTS

Lauren Woods

Director, Security Assistance Monitor

Elias Yousif

Deputy Director, Security Assistance Monitor
ABOUT

Security Assistance Monitor

We track and analyze U.S. security and defense assistance programs worldwide. By informing policymakers, media, scholars, NGOs and the public (in the United States and abroad) about trends and issues related to U.S. foreign security assistance, we seek to enhance transparency and promote greater oversight of U.S. military and police aid, arms sales and training.


Our interactive database compiles all publicly available data on U.S. foreign security assistance programs worldwide from 2000 to the present. Collected from a wide range of government documents, the database provides detailed numbers on U.S. arms sales, military and police aid and training programs. Users can search these numbers by country, region, program and assistance type. Video tutorials and a frequently asked questions section show users how to find the numbers and information they need. Our programs pages provide descriptions of all U.S. security assistance programs.


While our database is global, our research and analysis provide more in-depth insight on U.S. security policy in Africa, Central Eurasia, Latin America and the Caribbean and the Middle East, which can be found in our blog, fact sheets and publications. We also organize roundtables and briefings to promote a more nuanced understanding and encourage debate about key U.S. foreign security assistance issues.


In our extensive resource database of news, policy statements, legislation and events, users can find what lawmakers and experts are saying about U.S. global security policy, stay current with public events, hearings, official travel and reporting deadlines, and read all relevant security news for each of our focus regions.


See more at http://www.securityassistance.org.

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