SECURITY ASSISTANCE MONITOR

Security Assistance Monitor tracks and analyze U.S. security and defense assistance programs worldwide. By informing policymakers, media, scholars, NGOs and the public (in the United States and abroad) about trends and issues related to U.S. foreign security assistance, we seek to enhance transparency and promote greater oversight of U.S. military and police aid, arms sales and training.

RECENT PUBLICATIONS

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July 12, 2021

Factsheet: U.S. Foreign Military Training to Saudi Arabia in
Context

Lauren Woods

Four Saudis who participated in the killing of Washington Post journalist Jamal Khashoggi reportedly
received paramilitary training in the United States in 2017. This case has highlighted the ongoing
training the U.S. government and defense contractors provide for members of Saudi Arabia’s military
and raised questions about the vetting of participants.

Factsheet: U.S. Foreign Military Training to Saudi Arabia in 
Context
ISSUE BRIEF
June 14, 2021

Israel’s Exceptional Security Partnership with Washington

Elias Yousif

Israel is the largest historical recipient of U.S. foreign assistance, totaling more than $146 billion since 1950, equivalent to $236 billion in 2018 dollars, the vast majority coming in the form of military aid. But in the wake of Israel’s recent offensive in Gaza that killed over 243 Palestinians, including 63 children, and wrought untold physical damage on the densely populated enclave, advocates and lawmakers are raising questions about the wisdom and risks of the current U.S. security partnership with Israel, including the ways in which the partnership contravenes traditional norms, regulations, and statutes governing U.S. arms sales and security sector assistance.

This brief summarizes the exceptional elements of the Israeli military partnership with
Washington that pose unique challenges to oversight, accountability, and civilian protection.

Israel’s Exceptional Security Partnership with Washington
REPORT
June 2, 2021

Ever Shifting Goal Posts: Lessons from 20 Years of Security Assistance in Afghanistan

by Lauren Woods and Elias Yousif

In light of President Biden’s announcement of a U.S. troop withdrawal from Afghanistan by
September 11 of this year, this report offers several lessons learned, including committing
to a longer-term vision for security assistance in future endeavors. This is a conversation
and goal that U.S. and international planners should have prioritized from the very first days
in Afghanistan. There is no way to turn back the clock to reverse the mistakes of the last
20 years, but if some lessons can be gained from these efforts and the sacrifices that have
been made, then future similar efforts, if they must be made at all, will at least have a better
roadmap for what may lie ahead.

Ever Shifting Goal Posts: Lessons from 20 Years of Security Assistance in Afghanistan

LATEST NEWS

June 9, 2021

Warfighting vs Institution-Building: America’s Chronic Contradiction in Afghanistan

By Lauren Woods and Elias Yousif

The contradiction between the goals of warfighting and institution-building is just one of many factors in the failures of the United States and NATO countries to build up capable security forces in Afghanistan, but it is one of the most important, most ignored, and unfortunately, likely to be repeated.

June 2, 2021

Politico Morning Defense - Afghanistan

Lauren Woods and Elias Yousif's SAM Afghanistan Report quoted

A new report out today on the international security assistance effort offers a detailed rundown of lessons learned. “The scale, scope, and ambitions for security assistance often failed to consider what was actually achievable and the staggering resources that would be required to achieve them,” said the report from the Center for International Policy. “In the end, a striking asymmetry between the expectations of nations providing security assistance, especially the United States, put upon Afghanistan, regardless of its size and abilities, raised expectations for maximalist achievements and laid the groundwork for strategic failures.”

June 4, 2021

What you need to know about Israel’s military

CIP's Security Assistance Monitor mentioned

Israel is the most significant recipient of total US foreign military financing (FMF) – a programme that provides grants and loans to US allies to acquire “US defense equipment, services and training”. During the past two decades, 55 percent of all US FMF was dedicated to Israel, more than the rest of the world combined, according to Security Assistance Monitor, part of the Center for International Policy, a Washington DC-based think-tank.

May 23, 2021

Progressives ramp up scrutiny of US funding for Israel

CIP's Security Assistance Monitor Data Used

This article from The Hill on increasing scrutiny about US security assistance to Israel uses CIP SAM data: "Since 2001, Israel has received $63 billion in U.S. security assistance, most of which was foreign military financing, according to the Center for International Policy’s Security Assistance Monitor."

EXPERTS

Lauren Woods

Director, Security Assistance Monitor
Lauren Woods

Elias Yousif

Deputy Director, Security Assistance Monitor
Elias Yousif
  • Gordon Adams, Distinguished Fellow at the Stimson Center and professor in the U.S. Foreign Policy program at the School of International Service, American University

  • Amy Belasco, former Specialist for the Defense Budget of the Congressional Research Service

  • Neta Crawford, Professor and Department Chair of Political Science at Boston University

  • Matt Fay, former Director of Defense and Foreign Policy Studies at the Niskanen Center

  • Ben Friedman, Senior Fellow and Defense Scholar at Defense Priorities

  • Laicie Heeley, CEO of Inkstick, Host of Things That Go Boom

  • John King, Founder, King and Brown Company LLC

  • Larry Korb, Senior Fellow at the Center for American Progress and adjunct professor at Georgetown University

  • Lindsay Koshgarian, Program Director, National Priorities Project at the Institute for Policy Studies

  • Miriam Pemberton, Associate Fellow at the Institute for Policy Studies

  • Mandy Smithberger, Director of the Center for Defense Information at the Project On Government Oversight

  • Col. Larry Wilkerson (Ret.), Distinguished Adjunct Professor of Government and Public Policy, William & Mary

  • Col. Isaiah "Ike" Wilson (Ret.), director, Strategic Studies Institute, Army War College​

  • CIP Senior Associate Carl Conetta was a consultant to the project

ABOUT

Security Assistance Monitor

We track and analyze U.S. security and defense assistance programs worldwide. By informing policymakers, media, scholars, NGOs and the public (in the United States and abroad) about trends and issues related to U.S. foreign security assistance, we seek to enhance transparency and promote greater oversight of U.S. military and police aid, arms sales and training.


Our interactive database compiles all publicly available data on U.S. foreign security assistance programs worldwide from 2000 to the present. Collected from a wide range of government documents, the database provides detailed numbers on U.S. arms sales, military and police aid and training programs. Users can search these numbers by country, region, program and assistance type. Video tutorials and a frequently asked questions section show users how to find the numbers and information they need. Our programs pages provide descriptions of all U.S. security assistance programs.


While our database is global, our research and analysis provide more in-depth insight on U.S. security policy in Africa, Central Eurasia, Latin America and the Caribbean and the Middle East, which can be found in our blog, fact sheets and publications. We also organize roundtables and briefings to promote a more nuanced understanding and encourage debate about key U.S. foreign security assistance issues.


In our extensive resource database of news, policy statements, legislation and events, users can find what lawmakers and experts are saying about U.S. global security policy, stay current with public events, hearings, official travel and reporting deadlines, and read all relevant security news for each of our focus regions.


See more at http://www.securityassistance.org.