SECURITY ASSISTANCE MONITOR

Security Assistance Monitor tracks and analyze U.S. security and defense assistance programs worldwide. By informing policymakers, media, scholars, NGOs and the public (in the United States and abroad) about trends and issues related to U.S. foreign security assistance, we seek to enhance transparency and promote greater oversight of U.S. military and police aid, arms sales and training.

RECENT PUBLICATIONS

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FACTSHEET
April 26, 2021

U.S. Security Assistance to the Balkans

by Diellë Duga

Over the past decade, U.S. security assistance to the Balkans has surpassed $1 billion. Romania and Bulgaria are the top two Balkan states to receive security assistance, mainly for military modernization, Black Sea maritime domain awareness, and NATO interoperability. Their access to the Black Sea has geostrategic importance for U.S. security concerns over Russia and conflicts in the Middle East. The following top two recipient countries, Bosnia & Herzegovina and Kosovo, have received the most assistance in peacekeeping operations in the region and in Europe since 2000.

U.S. Security Assistance to the Balkans
ISSUE BRIEF
April 22, 2021

U.S. Security Assistance in the Sahel

by Elias Yousif and Nani Detti

This issue brief provides data on U.S. counter-terrorism expenditures in the Sahel through its security assistance program and describes why the current costly and militarized counter-terrorism strategy in the Sahel is failing.

U.S. Security Assistance in the Sahel
ISSUE BRIEF
April 7, 2021

Issue Brief: U.S. Arms Sales Trends, 2020 and Beyond – From Trump to Biden

by Elias Yousif and William Hartung

The Security Assistance Monitor's Latest Arms Sales Trends report find that U.S. foreign military sales (FMS) rose to an astounding $110.9 billion in calendar year 2020, an unprecedented surge in arms offers. The contrast with prior years is stark.

Issue Brief: U.S. Arms Sales Trends, 2020 and Beyond – From Trump to Biden

LATEST NEWS

April 15, 2021

From Endless War to Endless Operations

by Lauren Woods

The reaction to President Biden’s newly announced plan to withdraw all U.S. troops from Afghanistan by September 11 of this year has ranged from the dismay of Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, who called it a “grave mistake,” to more positive statements from Senate Democrats such as Tim Kaine, who said it’s time to bring U.S. troops home and refocus on other challenges.

Missing from these early reactions is a critical question: What does a troop withdrawal really look like in Afghanistan? And what are America’s plans for security assistance, or support for Afghanistan’s security forces, when U.S. troops leave?

April 9, 2021

Defense Business Brief: Defense giants gird for tax battle; $715B skinny budget; Mixed readiness picture; and more...

Center for International Policy mentioned

Findings from Security Assistance Monitor's "U.S. Arms Sales Trends: 2020 and Beyond From Trump to Biden" are cited in this issue of Defense One's Business Brief.

April 10, 2021

Today's D Brief: WestPac maneuvers; Iranian ship attacked; Hypersonic failure; Top US arms customers; And a bit more.

Center for International Policy mentioned

Security Assistance Monitor's report, "U.S Arms Sales Trends: 2020 and Beyond from Trump to Biden" cited in Defense One's D Brief.

April 9, 2021

Advocates await Biden’s course change on arms sales

William Hartung and Elias Yousif quoted

“The Trump administration’s arms sales policy prioritized narrow economic concerns over human rights and long-term U.S. strategic interests,” said Bill Hartung, director of the Arms and Security Program at the Center for International Policy and a co-author of the report. “By contrast, the Biden administration has launched a review of U.S. arms exports to determine which offers align with U.S. foreign policy interests ― a promising sign that a more balanced approach may be in the offing.”

EXPERTS

Lauren Woods

Director, Security Assistance Monitor
Lauren Woods

Elias Yousif

Deputy Director, Security Assistance Monitor
Elias Yousif
  • Gordon Adams, Distinguished Fellow at the Stimson Center and professor in the U.S. Foreign Policy program at the School of International Service, American University

  • Amy Belasco, former Specialist for the Defense Budget of the Congressional Research Service

  • Neta Crawford, Professor and Department Chair of Political Science at Boston University

  • Matt Fay, former Director of Defense and Foreign Policy Studies at the Niskanen Center

  • Ben Friedman, Senior Fellow and Defense Scholar at Defense Priorities

  • Laicie Heeley, CEO of Inkstick, Host of Things That Go Boom

  • John King, Founder, King and Brown Company LLC

  • Larry Korb, Senior Fellow at the Center for American Progress and adjunct professor at Georgetown University

  • Lindsay Koshgarian, Program Director, National Priorities Project at the Institute for Policy Studies

  • Miriam Pemberton, Associate Fellow at the Institute for Policy Studies

  • Mandy Smithberger, Director of the Center for Defense Information at the Project On Government Oversight

  • Col. Larry Wilkerson (Ret.), Distinguished Adjunct Professor of Government and Public Policy, William & Mary

  • Col. Isaiah "Ike" Wilson (Ret.), director, Strategic Studies Institute, Army War College​

  • CIP Senior Associate Carl Conetta was a consultant to the project

ABOUT

Security Assistance Monitor

We track and analyze U.S. security and defense assistance programs worldwide. By informing policymakers, media, scholars, NGOs and the public (in the United States and abroad) about trends and issues related to U.S. foreign security assistance, we seek to enhance transparency and promote greater oversight of U.S. military and police aid, arms sales and training.


Our interactive database compiles all publicly available data on U.S. foreign security assistance programs worldwide from 2000 to the present. Collected from a wide range of government documents, the database provides detailed numbers on U.S. arms sales, military and police aid and training programs. Users can search these numbers by country, region, program and assistance type. Video tutorials and a frequently asked questions section show users how to find the numbers and information they need. Our programs pages provide descriptions of all U.S. security assistance programs.


While our database is global, our research and analysis provide more in-depth insight on U.S. security policy in Africa, Central Eurasia, Latin America and the Caribbean and the Middle East, which can be found in our blog, fact sheets and publications. We also organize roundtables and briefings to promote a more nuanced understanding and encourage debate about key U.S. foreign security assistance issues.


In our extensive resource database of news, policy statements, legislation and events, users can find what lawmakers and experts are saying about U.S. global security policy, stay current with public events, hearings, official travel and reporting deadlines, and read all relevant security news for each of our focus regions.


See more at http://www.securityassistance.org.