DISMANTLING RACISM AND MILITARISM IN U.S. FOREIGN POLICY

The Racism-Militarism Paradigm that defines U.S. national security and has guided U.S. foreign policy since the country’s founding makes most Americans and the world less secure. At a moment when the largest mass movement in U.S. history is  demanding a reconstruction of the country to become a truly multiracial democracy and an international force for human rights and human security, there is an opportunity to change this paradigm and establish a new national consensus on the role the United States should play in the world.

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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
September 17, 2021

Executive Summary — Dismantling Racism and Militarism in U.S. Foreign Policy

by Salih Booker and Diana Ohlbaum

The major challenges facing Americans today—pandemic disease, climate change, economic inequality, racial and gender injustice—cannot be solved without international solidarity and human compassion.

Executive Summary — Dismantling Racism and Militarism in U.S. Foreign Policy
REPORT
September 17, 2021

Dismantling Racism and Militarism in U.S. Foreign Policy

by Salih Booker and Diana Ohlbaum

The current U.S. national security paradigm robs us of economic resources, corrupts our political system,
endangers our lives, and offends our most fundamental moral values.

It perpetuates a system that discriminates against, disempowers, disrespects, dehumanizes, and brutalizes Black and brown people and other communities of color. It is an extension of systemic white supremacy at home that relies upon the threat and use of force abroad.

Continuing the U.S. quest for global military domination harms not only the people of other countries and the earth we share, but the vast majority of Americans. The Racism-Militarism Paradigm, moreover, harms all of our social, political, and economic institutions, including our democratic institutions, thus weakening our entire society.

To peacefully and democratically dismantle this paradigm, we must offer a compelling alternative vision of the U.S. role in the world.

Dismantling Racism and Militarism in U.S. Foreign Policy
WEBINAR
September 17, 2021

Uniting to Dismantle Racism and Militarism in U.S. Foreign Policy

Salih Booker and Diana Ohlbaum

Webinar on dismantling structures of militarism and white supremacy in U.S. foreign policy.

Uniting to Dismantle Racism and Militarism in U.S. Foreign Policy

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Salih Booker

President & CEO
Salih Booker
  • Gordon Adams, Distinguished Fellow at the Stimson Center and professor in the U.S. Foreign Policy program at the School of International Service, American University

  • Amy Belasco, former Specialist for the Defense Budget of the Congressional Research Service

  • Neta Crawford, Professor and Department Chair of Political Science at Boston University

  • Matt Fay, former Director of Defense and Foreign Policy Studies at the Niskanen Center

  • Ben Friedman, Senior Fellow and Defense Scholar at Defense Priorities

  • Laicie Heeley, CEO of Inkstick, Host of Things That Go Boom

  • John King, Founder, King and Brown Company LLC

  • Larry Korb, Senior Fellow at the Center for American Progress and adjunct professor at Georgetown University

  • Lindsay Koshgarian, Program Director, National Priorities Project at the Institute for Policy Studies

  • Miriam Pemberton, Associate Fellow at the Institute for Policy Studies

  • Mandy Smithberger, Director of the Center for Defense Information at the Project On Government Oversight

  • Col. Larry Wilkerson (Ret.), Distinguished Adjunct Professor of Government and Public Policy, William & Mary

  • Col. Isaiah "Ike" Wilson (Ret.), director, Strategic Studies Institute, Army War College​

  • CIP Senior Associate Carl Conetta was a consultant to the project

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Dismantling Racism and Militarism in U.S. Foreign Policy

Led by CIP's Salih Booker and FCNL's Diana Ohlbaum, the Working Group on Dismantling Racism and Militarism in U.S. Foreign Policy met for 12 two-hour sessions between November 2020 and April 2021. The working group included a cross-section of advocates, activists, organizers, faith

community leaders, and scholars in the fields of U.S. foreign policy and national security; racial, economic and environmental justice; peacebuilding; migration; labor; human rights; feminism; and constitutional law. 


Over the course of the six months, participants discussed the nature of the system by which U.S. foreign policy is developed and legitimized and an overall strategy for making that system more democratic and more just. The paper that is published below reflects the contributions of the members of the group. who participated in their individual capacities and not as official representatives of their organizations.