ARMS & SECURITY PROGRAM

The Arms and Security Program engages in media outreach and public education aimed at promoting reforms in U.S. policies on nuclear weapons, military spending and the arms trade. It seeks to advance the notion that diplomacy and international cooperation are the most effective tools for protecting the United States.

RECENT PUBLICATIONS

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REPORT

Report: The Mideast Arms Bazaar: Top Arms Suppliers to the Middle East and North Africa , 2015-2019

by William D. Hartung and Jessica Draper

The Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region has been the site of multiple wars throughout this century. Current conflicts include the civil war in Syria, with outside intervention by Russia, Iran, Turkey, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and the United States (U.S.); the conflict in Libya, with intervention by Russia, the United Arab Emirates, France, Egypt, and Turkey; the Saudi-led war in Yemen; Egypt’s counterterror operations in the Northern Sinai; and a campaign of strikes and counter-strikes involving the U.S., Iran, and Iranian-backed militias in Iraq that has the potential to spiral into a larger conflict. The vast bulk of the weapons used in these wars are supplied by outside powers. This report document stop arms suppliers and recipients in the region between 2015 and 2019, based on data compiled by the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI).

Report: The Mideast Arms Bazaar: Top Arms Suppliers to the Middle East and North Africa , 2015-2019
FACT SHEET

Fact sheet: Corrupt Bargain? One Company’s Monopoly on the Development of Long-Range Nuclear Missiles

William Hartung

The Pentagon has just announced a $13.3 billion contract to Northrop Grumman for the development of a new Intercontinental Ballistic Missile (ICBM), known formally as the Ground-Based Strategic Deterrent (GBSD). The Department is poised to spend $85 to $150 billion over the next decade and beyond on this new generation of ICBMs. New ICBMs are both unnecessary and dangerous. In a crisis, the president has only a matter of minutes to decide whether to launch them, significantly increasing the risk of an accidental nuclear war. The best outcome would be to stop the development of the new ICBM and eliminate current long-range nuclear missiles from the U.S. arsenal.

Fact sheet: Corrupt Bargain? One Company’s Monopoly on the Development of Long-Range Nuclear Missiles
FACT SHEET

Fact Sheet: Special Interests or the National Interest?

by William Hartung

The size and composition of the U.S. nuclear arsenal should be determined by what is needed to deter potential adversaries from attacking the United States or its allies. But too often other factors come into play, most notably the vested interests of the lobby for Intercontinental Ballistic Missiles (ICBMs).

Fact Sheet: Special Interests or the National Interest?

LATEST NEWS

Biden to Name Adviser Tony Blinken as Sec. of State, Linda Thomas-Greenfield as U.N. Ambassador

William Hartung quoted

In an Intercept profile from 2018, William Hartung, an arms control expert at the Center for International Policy, said, “The revolving door is a longstanding feature of the military-industrial complex, and it can lead to distorted policy decisions based on the financial interests of former government employees.”

Congressional Budget Responses to the Pandemic: Fund Health Care, Not Warfare

co-authored by William Hartung

Congress needs to recognize the actual challenges to our national security and thereby sustain our people’s health and promote a prosperous and just economy. We are not in danger of being invaded by Russians, Chinese, Venezuelans, or Iranians; we are in danger of having the fabric of our society undermined by our failure to invest in and protect our national health and welfare.

Congress Should Block Trump’s Lame Duck Arms Deals With UAE

by William Hartung

Earlier this month, the Trump administration notified Congress of plans to sell over $23 billion in U.S. arms to the United Arab Emirates. The offers included advanced F-35 combat aircraft, armed MQ-9 drones, and an astounding $10 billion worth of bombs and missiles. The Trump team is seeking to rush through the sales in an effort to tie the hands of the incoming Biden administration. This gambit must not be allowed to succeed.

Not So Fast, Say Lawmakers Who Suspect Lame Duck Trump is Expediting UAE Weapons Deal

Elias Yousif and William Hartung quoted

“The UAE continues to maintain a contingent of forces in Yemen, and to arm and train militias that have engaged in systematic human rights abuses,” writes William Hartung and Elias Yousif in a recent Security Assistance Monitor brief. They also point to the UAE’s use of drones in Libya, which is in violation of a United Nations embargo.

EXPERTS

William Hartung

Director, Arms & Security Program
ABOUT

Arms & Security Program

The Arms and Security Program engages in media outreach and public education aimed at promoting reforms in U.S. policies on nuclear weapons, military spending and the arms trade. It seeks to advance the notion that diplomacy and international cooperation are the most effective tools for protecting the United States. The use of military force is largely irrelevant in addressing the greatest dangers we face, from terrorism, to nuclear proliferation, to epidemics of disease, to climate change, to inequities of wealth and income. The allocation of budgetary resources needs to be changed to reflect this reality.

Program goals include:

  • Restructuring the Pentagon budget to address 21st century challenges, with a goal of reducing it to levels needed for defense while eliminating wasteful or ill-advised programs.

  • Playing a central role in efforts to accelerate reductions in nuclear arsenals and increase spending on programs designed to prevent nuclear weapons and bomb-making materials from getting into the hands of terrorists.

  • Sparking a dialogue on the implications of the U.S. role as the world’s number one arms exporting nation.

Center for International Policy

2000 M Street NW, Suite 720, Washington, DC 20036

(202) 232-3317

The Baraza, a CIP blog, is a never-ending and global town hall meeting on U.S. foreign policy.
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