ARMS & SECURITY PROGRAM

The Arms and Security Program engages in media outreach and public education aimed at promoting reforms in U.S. policies on nuclear weapons, military spending and the arms trade. It seeks to advance the notion that diplomacy and international cooperation are the most effective tools for protecting the United States.

RECENT PUBLICATIONS

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ISSUE BRIEF
October 12, 2021

Profiteers Of Armageddon: Producers Of The Next Generation Of Nuclear Weapons

by William Hartung

It’s long past time that we stopped allowing special interest lobbying and corporate profits
stand in the way of a more sensible nuclear policy.

Profiteers Of Armageddon: Producers Of The Next Generation Of Nuclear Weapons
FACTSHEET
September 30, 2021

Factsheet: Profits of War

William Hartung

The reaction to the 9/11 attacks created a political climate that opened the floodgates to massive increases in Pentagon spending with few questions asked. Since the start of the war in Afghanistan, Pentagon spending has totaled over $14 trillion, one-half or more of which went to defense contractors. After the 9/11 attacks, the Pentagon budget increased year after year for 10 years running, peaking in 2010 at the highest level since World War II.

Factsheet: Profits of War
REPORT
September 13, 2021

Profits of War: Corporate Beneficiaries of the Post-9/11 Pentagon Spending Surge

by William Hartung, in collaboration with Brown University's Costs of War

This report reviews the major sources of corporate profit tied to America’s post 9/11 wars, as well as other factors driving the enormous surge in military spending during the first two decades of this century, including the growth in the global arms trade, the recent focus on construing China as a threat, and large Pentagon budgets.

Profits of War: Corporate Beneficiaries	of the Post-9/11 Pentagon Spending Surge

LATEST NEWS

October 21, 2021

The Biden Administration Is Building Back to the Brink of a New Cold War

William Hartung quoted

Contrary to what many have been led to believe, China is not a military challenge to the United States. “The true challenges from China are political and economic, not military,” Pentagon expert William Hartung has rightly explained.

October 19, 2021

What Buying the Support of Top Think Tanks Gets You

By Taylor Giorno

With nearly $2 trillion for nuclear modernization on the table over the next three decades, it’s no surprise major nuclear weapons contractors are doing everything in their power to capture these coveted, costly projects. Capitol Hill is no stranger to the revolving door of lobbyists that funnel in and out of its hallowed halls.

October 20, 2021

Do We Really Care for Afghanistan’s Future?

William Hartung quoted

As William Hartung, director of the Arms and Security Program at the Center for International Policy, pointed out: most disturbingly, a congressional investigation found that a significant portion of $2 billion worth of transportation contracts issued to US and Afghan firms ended up as kickbacks to warlords and police officials or as payments to the Taliban to allow large convoys of trucks to pass through areas they controlled, sometimes as much as $1,500 per truck, or up to half a million dollars for each 300-truck convoy. In 2009, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton stated that “one of the major sources of funding for the Taliban is the protection money” paid from just such transportation contracts.

October 16, 2021

To Avoid Armageddon, Don’t Modernize Missiles—Eliminate Them

William Hartung quoted

In a report issued this year by the Center for International Policy, nuclear weapons expert William Hartung gives readers a detailed look “Inside the ICBM Lobby,” showing how ICBM contractors get their way while throwing millions of dollars at politicians and deploying battalions of lobbyists on Capitol Hill.

EXPERTS

William Hartung

Director, Arms & Security Program
  • Gordon Adams, Distinguished Fellow at the Stimson Center and professor in the U.S. Foreign Policy program at the School of International Service, American University

  • Amy Belasco, former Specialist for the Defense Budget of the Congressional Research Service

  • Neta Crawford, Professor and Department Chair of Political Science at Boston University

  • Matt Fay, former Director of Defense and Foreign Policy Studies at the Niskanen Center

  • Ben Friedman, Senior Fellow and Defense Scholar at Defense Priorities

  • Laicie Heeley, CEO of Inkstick, Host of Things That Go Boom

  • John King, Founder, King and Brown Company LLC

  • Larry Korb, Senior Fellow at the Center for American Progress and adjunct professor at Georgetown University

  • Lindsay Koshgarian, Program Director, National Priorities Project at the Institute for Policy Studies

  • Miriam Pemberton, Associate Fellow at the Institute for Policy Studies

  • Mandy Smithberger, Director of the Center for Defense Information at the Project On Government Oversight

  • Col. Larry Wilkerson (Ret.), Distinguished Adjunct Professor of Government and Public Policy, William & Mary

  • Col. Isaiah "Ike" Wilson (Ret.), director, Strategic Studies Institute, Army War College​

  • CIP Senior Associate Carl Conetta was a consultant to the project

ABOUT

Arms & Security Program

The Arms and Security Program engages in media outreach and public education aimed at promoting reforms in U.S. policies on nuclear weapons, military spending and the arms trade. It seeks to advance the notion that diplomacy and international cooperation are the most effective tools for protecting the United States. The use of military force is largely irrelevant in addressing the greatest dangers we face, from terrorism, to nuclear proliferation, to epidemics of disease, to climate change, to inequities of wealth and income. The allocation of budgetary resources needs to be changed to reflect this reality.

Program goals include:

  • Restructuring the Pentagon budget to address 21st century challenges, with a goal of reducing it to levels needed for defense while eliminating wasteful or ill-advised programs.

  • Playing a central role in efforts to accelerate reductions in nuclear arsenals and increase spending on programs designed to prevent nuclear weapons and bomb-making materials from getting into the hands of terrorists.

  • Sparking a dialogue on the implications of the U.S. role as the world’s number one arms exporting nation.