ARMS & SECURITY PROGRAM

The Arms and Security Program engages in media outreach and public education aimed at promoting reforms in U.S. policies on nuclear weapons, military spending and the arms trade. It seeks to advance the notion that diplomacy and international cooperation are the most effective tools for protecting the United States.

RECENT PUBLICATIONS

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FACT SHEET

FUELING CONFLICT: U.S. Arms Sales to the United Arab Emirates and the U.S./UAE Military Alliance Fact Sheet

by William Hartung

This fact sheet corresponds with Arms and Security Program's newest report by the same name and provides several of the report's major findings.

FUELING CONFLICT: U.S. Arms Sales to the United Arab Emirates and the U.S./UAE Military Alliance Fact Sheet
REPORT

Fueling Conflict: U.S. Arms Sales to the United Arab Emirates and the U.S.-UAE Military Alliance

by William Hartung

In November 2020, the Trump administration notified Congress of offers of F-35 combat air- craft, MQ-9 armed drones, and bombs and missiles to the United Arab Emirates (UAE) worth a total of over $23 billion — the largest U.S. arms package ever offered to the Emirates. These deals threaten to increase violence and fuel conflict at a time when the Biden administration should prioritize ending conflicts in the greater Middle East.

The Biden administration can and should reverse the deal. Arms sales to the UAE should be cut off as part of a review of the entire U.S.-UAE alliance in light of the urgent need to revise U.S. strategic objectives in the Middle East as a whole.

The latest arms sales come in the context of a longstanding U.S. military relationship with the UAE which will be detailed in this report.

Fueling Conflict: U.S. Arms Sales to the United Arab Emirates and the U.S.-UAE Military Alliance
ESSAY

A Realistic, Progressive Foreign Policy for the United States

by Dan Plesch

A progressive international agenda needs to begin with a frank assessment of the present strategic culture and connect domestic and global progressive priorities. Global threats such as climate change and nuclear weapons have not been prioritized, while national treasure is squandered in endless wars. The national security necessity that Covid-19 be contained and eliminated provides a deadly reminder that in an interconnected world national action requires international coordination. An international policy that is effective for Americans needs to network progressive policy at home and abroad.

A Realistic, Progressive Foreign Policy for the United States

LATEST NEWS

After the Apocalypse: Defense Spending

William Hartung contributed

Our greatest security challenges — the pandemic, the climate crisis, and racial and economic injustice – are not military in nature and spending more on the Pentagon will do nothing to help solve them. Meanwhile, our post-9/11 wars have cost over $6.4 trillion with hundreds of thousands of lives lost on all sides, without making America or the world safer.

Biden calls Saudi King Salman ahead of release of Khashoggi report

William Hartung quoted

"This confirmation of bin Salman's role underscores the urgent need for a new approach to the US-Saudi relationship," William Hartung, director of the Arms and Security Project at the Center for International Policy, said in a statement on Thursday.

Capitalizing on conflict: How defense contractors and foreign nations lobby for arms sales

William Hartung's report quoted

Saudi Arabia also benefits from the influence wielded by major U.S. arms manufacturers that would like to sell to them. Just four of the biggest companies received 90 percent of promised sales between 2009 and 2019, according to the Center for International Policy. Those four — Lockheed Martin, Raytheon, General Dynamics and Boeing — also happen to make up four of the top five defense-related companies spending the most on lobbying, pouring over $10 million each into their policy influence efforts in 2020 alone.

'A reckoning is near': America has a vast overseas military empire. Does it still need it?

William Hartung quoted

"China's playing a totally different game to the U.S.," said William Hartung, director of the Arms and Security Project at the Center for International Policy in Washington, D.C. "The U.S. is relying on traditional military bases, global military reach and training local militaries, while China is forging ahead by cutting economic deals that appear to be buying them more influence than the U.S.'s military approach."
"In all these wars the U.S. has expended so much in terms of blood and treasure with actually very little to show for it," said Hartung of the Center for International Policy. "A reckoning is near."

EXPERTS

William Hartung

Director, Arms & Security Program
ABOUT

Arms & Security Program

The Arms and Security Program engages in media outreach and public education aimed at promoting reforms in U.S. policies on nuclear weapons, military spending and the arms trade. It seeks to advance the notion that diplomacy and international cooperation are the most effective tools for protecting the United States. The use of military force is largely irrelevant in addressing the greatest dangers we face, from terrorism, to nuclear proliferation, to epidemics of disease, to climate change, to inequities of wealth and income. The allocation of budgetary resources needs to be changed to reflect this reality.

Program goals include:

  • Restructuring the Pentagon budget to address 21st century challenges, with a goal of reducing it to levels needed for defense while eliminating wasteful or ill-advised programs.

  • Playing a central role in efforts to accelerate reductions in nuclear arsenals and increase spending on programs designed to prevent nuclear weapons and bomb-making materials from getting into the hands of terrorists.

  • Sparking a dialogue on the implications of the U.S. role as the world’s number one arms exporting nation.

Center for International Policy

2000 M Street NW, Suite 720, Washington, DC 20036

(202) 232-3317

The Baraza, a CIP blog, is a never-ending and global town hall meeting on U.S. foreign policy.
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