AFRICA PROGRAM

CIP’s Africa Program tracks and analyzes U.S. foreign policy toward the nations of Africa. By informing policymakers, the media, scholars, NGOs and the public – both in the United States and Africa – about trends and issues related to U.S. foreign policy toward Africa, CIP seeks to promote greater positive U.S. engagement with the nations of Africa and with Africa’s regional and continental organizations.

RECENT PUBLICATIONS

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AP WEEKLY MONITOR

U.S. Africa Policy Monitor February 23, 2021

Sahel, a region in Africa composed of 10 countries, has seen increased security issues in recent history. These perpetual problems were addressed in 2016 at a G-5 Sahel Summit, where French President Macron promised a continued development of counterterrorism efforts in the area. As the Sahel region experiences a constant compromise of security by jihadist groups, the promises of the Sahel Summit need a modern evaluation.

U.S. Africa Policy Monitor February 23, 2021
FACT SHEET

Global Magnitsky Act Sanctions: African Nations

By Temi Ibirogba and Sifa Kasongo

The Global Magnitsky Human Rights Accountability Act was adopted by the U.S. Congress in 2016. Along with Executive Order 13818, it allows the U.S. government to sanction individuals and/or entities involved in serious human rights abuses and/or corruption around the world. Sanctions are in the form of blocking or revoking U.S. visas and freezing of assets and property in the U.S.

As of January 25, 2021, 246 individuals and entities ranging across 29 countries have been sanctioned under Executive Order 13818, either for human rights abuses and/or corruption. Of the 246 sanctions, there are 84 Global Magnitsky designations in Africa (34 %) across eight countries.

Global Magnitsky Act Sanctions: African Nations
AP WEEKLY MONITOR

U.S. Africa Policy Monitor February 9, 2021

This edition, in reflection of Black History Month, analyzes the historic U.S. exploitation of the mineral rich nation of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Realizing the hand America has had in the shaping of the Congo's government and history.

U.S. Africa Policy Monitor February 9, 2021

LATEST NEWS

U.S. Begins Withdrawing Troops from Somalia, but Regional Hurdles Remain

Salih Booker Interviewed

"The military victory is out of the reach of the federal government. It's out of the reach of the U.S. government. But it's also unlikely that Al-Shabaab can achieve a decisive military victory. And, therefore, it's time to change the strategic goal to one of political reconciliation and peace negotiations."

Monday Morning QB - December 7

Nani Detti interviewed

"The Tigray conflict has involved a lot of finger-pointing between Ethiopia's federal government and TPLF, making it difficult to verify each party's report about the events that took place during the conflict."

U.S. begins withdrawing troops from Somalia, but regional hurdles remain

Salih Booker Interviewed

"The military victory is out of the reach of the federal government. It's out of the reach of the U.S. government. But it's also unlikely that Al-Shabaab can achieve a decisive military victory. And, therefore, it's time to change the strategic goal to one of political reconciliation and peace negotiations."

U.S.-Funded Counterterrorism Efforts in West Africa Aren't Helping

Temi Ibirogba quoted

“It’s clear that the U.S. counterterrorism plan for Africa in the wake of 9/11 is a foreign policy failure,” said Temi Ibirogba, the Program and Research Associate for the Africa Program at the Center for International Policy. “These trends mean we need to think about racism within U.S. foreign policy. American exceptionalism has caused the U.S. to believe that their involvement in arming and supporting local security forces is what Africa needs.”

It is essential, Ibirogba told VICE World News, to replace the counterterrorism security model with one rooted in holistic peacebuilding measures. “What is needed is a human security approach that addresses the multidimensional root causes of issues,” she said. “One that focuses on investing in African nations’s infrastructures, health care systems, mental health services, social welfare programs, businesses and more, rather than investing in their militaries and police forces who are guilty of gross human rights violations.”

EXPERTS

Salih Booker

President & CEO

Temi Ibirogba

Program & Research Associate, Africa Program
ABOUT

Africa Program

CIP’s Africa Program tracks and analyzes U.S. foreign policy toward the nations of Africa. By informing policymakers, the media, scholars, NGOs and the public – both in the United States and Africa – about trends and issues related to U.S. foreign policy toward Africa, CIP seeks to promote greater positive U.S. engagement with the nations of Africa and with Africa’s regional and continental organizations. CIP works to increase the level of transparency in U.S. relations with Africa and to promote greater Congressional oversight with regard to policies concerning human rights and democracy, security cooperation, economic development, trade policies and other U.S. policies on global issues that impact the continent such as climate change and migration.


The Africa Program will produce occasional reports, articles and commentary; and also organize roundtable discussions and briefings to promote an informed debate about key U.S. policies toward Africa. CIP’s objective is to promote the demilitarization of U.S. Africa policy and to increase peaceful engagement through diplomacy and development cooperation to address regional and global challenges.

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The Baraza, a CIP blog, is a never-ending and global town hall meeting on U.S. foreign policy.
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