William Hartung

William Hartung

Director, Arms & Security Program

William D. Hartung is the director of the Arms and Security Program at CIP and a senior adviser to the center's Security Assistance Monitor. He is the author of Prophets of War: Lockheed Martin and the Making of the Military-Industrial Complex (Nation Books, 2011) and the co-editor, with Miriam Pemberton, of Lessons from Iraq: Avoiding the Next War (Paradigm Press, 2008). His previous books include And Weapons for All (HarperCollins, 1995), a critique of U.S. arms sales policies from the Nixon through Clinton administrations. From July 2007 through March 2011, Mr. Hartung was the director of the Arms and Security Initiative at the New America Foundation. Prior to that, he served as the director of the Arms Trade Resource Center at the World Policy Institute. He also worked as a speechwriter and policy analyst for New York State Attorney General Robert Abrams. Bill Hartung’s articles on security issues have appeared in the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Los Angeles Times, The Nation, and the World Policy Journal. He has been a featured expert on national security issues on CBS 60 Minutes, NBC Nightly News, the PBS Newshour, CNN, Fox News, and scores of local, regional, and international radio outlets. He blogs for the Huffington Post, the Hill, and Medium.

RECENT PUBLICATIONS

ISSUE BRIEF
May 4, 2021

Executive Excess: CEO Compensation in the Arms Industry, 2020

by William D. Hartung and Leila Riazi

On April 9th, the Biden administration announced a proposal for Pentagon spending and related nuclear weapons work at the Department of Energy in excess of $750 billion – three-quarters of a trillion dollars ... These enormous sums for the Pentagon are often justified as necessary to meet the needs
of military personnel, but in fact, roughly half of the Pentagon’s budget is spent on corporations

Executive Excess: CEO Compensation in the Arms Industry, 2020
ISSUE BRIEF
April 15, 2021

Transferring Arms to the UAE is not in U.S. Security Interests

by William Hartung

The Biden administration’s decision to approve a $23 billion package of F-35 combat aircraft, MQ-9 armed drones, and $10 billion in bombs and missiles to the United Arab Emirates (UAE) contradicts its pledge to make human rights and long-term U.S. interests the central factors in deciding which nations to supply with U.S. arms. The UAE is an unreliable partner that has fueled conflict, transferred U.S.-supplied weapons to extremist groups, and inflicted severe human rights abuses on its own population. Its conduct has done more harm than good with respect to U.S. security interests. Whatever pledges the UAE may make regarding its use of the U.S. weapons involved in the current package, the UAE’s record does not inspire confidence that it will abide by them.

Transferring Arms to the UAE is not in U.S. Security Interests
ISSUE BRIEF
April 7, 2021

Issue Brief: U.S. Arms Sales Trends, 2020 and Beyond – From Trump to Biden

by Elias Yousif and William Hartung

The Security Assistance Monitor's Latest Arms Sales Trends report find that U.S. foreign military sales (FMS) rose to an astounding $110.9 billion in calendar year 2020, an unprecedented surge in arms offers. The contrast with prior years is stark.

Issue Brief: U.S. Arms Sales Trends, 2020 and Beyond – From Trump to Biden

LATEST NEWS

May 6, 2021

Activist confronts defense industry CEO for company’s role in war crimes

Center for International Policy mentioned

William Hartung's Issue Brief "Executive Excess: CEO Compensation in the Arms Industry, 2020" is cited in this article.

May 5, 2021

Execs at Top Pentagon Contractors Raked in $276.5 Million Last Year, Analysis Finds

William Hartung quoted

"Congress and the administration should take a closer look at these costs," says report lead author William D. Hartung, "with an eye towards reducing them and freeing up funds for other needed purposes."

May 6, 2021

Military-Industrial Complex Exerts Powerful Influence on Biden’s Foreign Policy

William Hartung cited

William Hartung's article in the Nation cited on "the role of major defense contractors, such as Raytheon, United Technologies and Lockheed-Martin, in lobbying Congress."

May 5, 2021

Defense CEO fat cat salaries defy COVID crisis

William Harting quoted

According to a new report by the Center for International Policy, aptly entitled, “Executive Excess: CEO Compensation in the Arms Industry, 2020,” authors William Hartung and Leila Riazi detail the enormous sums of money paid to just a handful of individuals each year in an industry notorious for its over-reliance on the federal trough. In 2020, the CEOs of the Top 5 — Northrop Grumman, Lockheed Martin, Raytheon, General Dynamics, and Boeing — made more than $150 million. When expanded to other top company officers required to disclose their earnings, that number goes up to an astonishing $276 million.