William Hartung

William Hartung

Director, Arms & Security Program

William D. Hartung is the director of the Arms and Security Program at CIP and a senior adviser to the center's Security Assistance Monitor. He is the author of Prophets of War: Lockheed Martin and the Making of the Military-Industrial Complex (Nation Books, 2011) and the co-editor, with Miriam Pemberton, of Lessons from Iraq: Avoiding the Next War (Paradigm Press, 2008). His previous books include And Weapons for All (HarperCollins, 1995), a critique of U.S. arms sales policies from the Nixon through Clinton administrations. From July 2007 through March 2011, Mr. Hartung was the director of the Arms and Security Initiative at the New America Foundation. Prior to that, he served as the director of the Arms Trade Resource Center at the World Policy Institute. He also worked as a speechwriter and policy analyst for New York State Attorney General Robert Abrams. Bill Hartung’s articles on security issues have appeared in the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Los Angeles Times, The Nation, and the World Policy Journal. He has been a featured expert on national security issues on CBS 60 Minutes, NBC Nightly News, the PBS Newshour, CNN, Fox News, and scores of local, regional, and international radio outlets. He blogs for the Huffington Post, the Hill, and Medium.

RECENT PUBLICATIONS

TESTIMONY
May 12, 2021

Testimony of William D. Hartung

William D. Hartung

Hearing on Waste, Fraud, Cost Overruns and Auditing at the Pentagon: Senate Budget Committee

Testimony of William D. Hartung
TESTIMONY
May 12, 2021

Testimony of William D. Hartung to the US Senate Budget Committee

William D. Hartung

Our William Hartung, Director of CIP's Arms and Security Program, recently testified at the Senate Hearing on Waste, Fraud, Cost Overruns and Auditing at the Pentagon. "I see four major types of waste in the Pentagon budget, starting with the big picture and moving down into specific examples. The four areas include misguided strategy; purchasing ineffective weapons systems that don’t serve our strategic interests; overpaying for basic items; and maintaining excess overhead." Read his full testimony here.

Testimony of William D. Hartung to the US Senate Budget Committee
ISSUE BRIEF
May 4, 2021

Executive Excess: CEO Compensation in the Arms Industry, 2020

by William D. Hartung and Leila Riazi

On April 9th, the Biden administration announced a proposal for Pentagon spending and related nuclear weapons work at the Department of Energy in excess of $750 billion – three-quarters of a trillion dollars ... These enormous sums for the Pentagon are often justified as necessary to meet the needs
of military personnel, but in fact, roughly half of the Pentagon’s budget is spent on corporations

Executive Excess: CEO Compensation in the Arms Industry, 2020

LATEST NEWS

July 21, 2021

If Biden can’t stand up to Saudi Arabia, then Congress should

William Hartung

Given the ongoing suffering caused by the war, Yemen can’t wait any longer for immediate, forceful U.S. action to end the war. If the Biden administration won’t act promptly, Congress should.

July 20, 2021

China's role in promoting peace hailed

William Hartung quoted

"Cooperation with China on issues like climate change and preventing pandemics should take precedence over spinning out war scenarios or preparing for a military confrontation. The overwhelming emphasis on Beijing as the ultimate threat to the United States is misguided and is more likely to undermine US security than it is to enhance it."

July 20, 2021

U.S. Far Outpaces China in Military Spending

William Hartung

"The best approach for assuring U.S. and global security is for the U.S. and China is to cooperate on urgent challenges like curbing climate change. America should nurture its own domestic economy, infrastructure, and technology base—not necessarily as a “competition” with China, but because it is valuable in its own right."

July 11, 2021

Biden’s $1.3 Trillion ‘National Security’ Budget Won’t Make Us Safer - Eurasia Review

co-authored by William D. Hartung

Developments of the past year and a half — an ongoing pandemic, an intensifying mega-drought, white supremacy activities, and racial and economic injustice among them — should have underscored that the greatest threats to American lives are anything but military in nature. But no matter, the Biden administration has decided to double down on military spending as the primary pillar of what still passes for American security policy.