Elias Yousif

Elias Yousif

Deputy Director, Security Assistance Monitor

Elias joins CIP with several years of experience in foreign affairs research and human rights advocacy. He was previously with the Atlantic Council as part of their external relations team. Prior to joining the Atlantic Council, he was a Campaigns and Research Officer with Crisis Action, an international civilian protection advocacy organization. While with Crisis Action, based both in Beirut, Lebanon, and Washington D.C., Elias provided in-depth research and analysis to a global coalition of civil society organizations campaigning for civilian protection in South Sudan, Syria, and Yemen. He holds a Bachelors degree in International Relations from American University, with a focus on Middle East politics and U.S. foreign policy.

RECENT PUBLICATIONS

ISSUE BRIEF
April 22, 2021

U.S. Security Assistance in the Sahel

by Elias Yousif and Nani Detti

This issue brief provides data on U.S. counter-terrorism expenditures in the Sahel through its security assistance program and describes why the current costly and militarized counter-terrorism strategy in the Sahel is failing.

U.S. Security Assistance in the Sahel
ISSUE BRIEF
April 7, 2021

Issue Brief: U.S. Arms Sales Trends, 2020 and Beyond – From Trump to Biden

by Elias Yousif and William Hartung

The Security Assistance Monitor's Latest Arms Sales Trends report find that U.S. foreign military sales (FMS) rose to an astounding $110.9 billion in calendar year 2020, an unprecedented surge in arms offers. The contrast with prior years is stark.

Issue Brief: U.S. Arms Sales Trends, 2020 and Beyond – From Trump to Biden
REPORT
April 7, 2021

U.S. Arms Sales Trends: 2020 and Beyond from Trump to Biden

By William D. Hartung and Elias Yousif

After an unprecedented increase in Foreign Military Sales (FMS) in the final year of the Trump administration, the early months of the Biden administration suggest a change of course may be underway in deciding which nations receive U.S. weaponry – a change that could elevate human rights, observation of international humanitarian law (IHL), and long- term strategic concerns over narrow economic considerations. This report will explore this issue in the context of trends in U.S. arms sales in 2020 and early arms sales-related pronouncements of the Biden administration.

U.S. Arms Sales Trends: 2020 and Beyond from Trump to Biden

LATEST NEWS

April 10, 2021

Today's D Brief: WestPac maneuvers; Iranian ship attacked; Hypersonic failure; Top US arms customers; And a bit more.

Center for International Policy mentioned

Security Assistance Monitor's report, "U.S Arms Sales Trends: 2020 and Beyond from Trump to Biden" cited in Defense One's D Brief.

April 9, 2021

Advocates await Biden’s course change on arms sales

William Hartung and Elias Yousif quoted

“The Trump administration’s arms sales policy prioritized narrow economic concerns over human rights and long-term U.S. strategic interests,” said Bill Hartung, director of the Arms and Security Program at the Center for International Policy and a co-author of the report. “By contrast, the Biden administration has launched a review of U.S. arms exports to determine which offers align with U.S. foreign policy interests ― a promising sign that a more balanced approach may be in the offing.”

April 9, 2021

Defense Business Brief: Defense giants gird for tax battle; $715B skinny budget; Mixed readiness picture; and more...

Center for International Policy mentioned

Findings from Security Assistance Monitor's "U.S. Arms Sales Trends: 2020 and Beyond From Trump to Biden" are cited in this issue of Defense One's Business Brief.

April 7, 2021

Politico Morning Defense: April 7, 2021

Center for International Policy mentioned

Security Assistance Monitor's report, "U.S. Arms Sales Trends : 2020 and Beyond from Trump to Biden" cited in Politico's Morning Defense.