ARMS & SECURITY PROGRAM

The Arms and Security Program engages in media outreach and public education aimed at promoting reforms in U.S. policies on nuclear weapons, military spending and the arms trade. It seeks to advance the notion that diplomacy and international cooperation are the most effective tools for protecting the United States

Recent Publications

Report: The Mideast Arms Bazaar: Top Arms Suppliers to the Middle East and North Africa , 2015-2019

by William D. Hartung and Jessica Draper

Sept-22-2020

The Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region has been the site of multiple wars
throughout this century. Current conflicts include the civil war in Syria, with outside
intervention by Russia, Iran, Turkey, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and the United States (U.S.); the
conflict in Libya, with intervention by Russia, the United Arab Emirates, France, Egypt, and
Turkey; the Saudi-led war in Yemen; Egypt’s counterterror operations in the Northern Sinai; and a campaign of strikes and counter-strikes involving the U.S., Iran, and Iranian-backed militias in Iraq that has the potential to spiral into a larger conflict. The vast bulk of the weapons used in these wars are supplied by outside powers. This report document stop arms suppliers and recipients in the region between 2015 and 2019, based on data compiled by the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI).

Fact sheet: Corrupt Bargain? One Company’s Monopoly on the Development of Long-Range Nuclear Missiles

by William Hartung

Sept-9-2020

The Pentagon has just announced a $13.3 billion contract to Northrop Grumman for the development of a new Intercontinental Ballistic Missile (ICBM), known formally as the Ground-Based Strategic Deterrent (GBSD). The Department is poised to spend $85 to $150 billion over the next decade and beyond on this new generation of ICBMs. New ICBMs are both unnecessary and dangerous. In a crisis, the president has only a matter of minutes to decide whether to launch them, significantly increasing the risk of an accidental nuclear war. The best outcome would be to stop the development of the new ICBM and eliminate current long-range nuclear missiles from the U.S. arsenal.

Fact Sheet: Special Interests or the National Interest?

by William Hartung

Jun-08-2020

The size and composition of the U.S. nuclear arsenal should be determined by what is needed to deter potential adversaries from attacking the United States or its allies. But too often other factors come into play, most notably the vested interests of the lobby for Intercontinental Ballistic Missiles (ICBMs).

Latest News

Defense Contractors Don’t Need Another Covid Bailout

William Hartung quoted

Sept-16-2020

Arms & Security Program

In rebuilding the economy, however, count on one thing: Defense contractors will put every last lobbying dollar into an attempt to convince the public, Congress, and whatever administration is in power that their sector is the country’s major engine for creating jobs. As Bill Hartung has shown, however, a close examination of such job-creation claims rarely stands up to serious scrutiny.

Institutionalized Racism in U.S. Foreign Policy

William Hartung quoted

Sept-23-2020

Arms & Security Program

William Hartung, the director of the arms and security project at the Center for International Policy, explains that this spike in African terrorism incidents shows that the U.S. militarization response toward Africa was wholly unsuccessful in quelling violence in Africa as it was intended to do. He adds that fighting violence with violence may be aggravating the issue, instead of helping.

A $13 Billion Contract for ICBMs: What’s the Rush?

by William Hartung

Sept-23-2020

Arms & Security Program

The recent announcement by the U.S. Air Force that it will award Northrop Grumman $13.3 billion to develop a new intercontinental ballistic missile raises more questions than it answers. First and foremost: what’s the rush? The move greatly complicates the ability of the next administration – whoever wins the election in November – to rethink the Pentagon’s $2 trillion nuclear modernization plan in light of other demands both within and outside of the department’s budget.

Meet The Experts

William Hartung

Director

About the Arms & Security Program

The Arms and Security Program engages in media outreach and public education aimed at promoting reforms in U.S. policies on nuclear weapons, military spending and the arms trade. It seeks to advance the notion that diplomacy and international cooperation are the most effective tools for protecting the United States. The use of military force is largely irrelevant in addressing the greatest dangers we face, from terrorism, to nuclear proliferation, to epidemics of disease, to climate change, to inequities of wealth and income. The allocation of budgetary resources needs to be changed to reflect this reality.

Program goals include:

  • Restructuring the Pentagon budget to address 21st century challenges, with a goal of reducing it to levels needed for defense while eliminating wasteful or ill-advised programs.

  • Playing a central role in efforts to accelerate reductions in nuclear arsenals and increase spending on programs designed to prevent nuclear weapons and bomb-making materials from getting into the hands of terrorists.

  • Sparking a dialogue on the implications of the U.S. role as the world’s number one arms exporting nation.

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